Thursday, December 14, 2006

What were u doing June '83?

Here's me ropin' out at Fort Robinson. What you see here is a breakaway roping. It's for youth and points for the world show are earned for placing. Someone had asked my dad if he would enter me to increase the number of participants and consequently increase the number of points for the winner. It's known as "filling" a class. Anyway, Dad said sure, put me on his horse, and sent me to the box. I ended up winning it. I think it's a good example of visualization (training and learning in your mind) because although I had watched my dad a million times b/c I was stuck manning the chute, I'd never practiced or even wanted to do it. My brain just recorded the actions and when shoved into the fray made the body execute them. I do a lot of visualization on my bike because it's really only in your head where you can practice perfectly. So, I try to practice taking corners, reride bits of cross-courses, or see how to apply a strategy or skill in my head. I find this a good occupation while on the trainer.

16 comments:

Emily said...

good story, syd! sweet.

gravy said...

Summer of 83? Went gliding in soar planes in Colorado.

BTW- Question was asked if we went to Lincoln High at the same time? I'm class of '90. The only older kid I remember is a girl, Natalie Murrish.

Also, those donuts are STILL there by the car wash.

sydney_b said...

i keep seeing those donuts too. Must have really potent preservatives. Hmm. I don't remember a Natalie.

Anonymous said...

Summer of 1983 ... I was enjoying the perks and benefits of being 6 years old.

Anonymous said...

That looks like fun.

'83 I was probably playing outside with the neighborhood gang or watchin' GI Joe.

mg said...

AMEN SYD! you are so right on with the visualization stuff. amazing.

at 6 years old i taught myself how to ride my uncle's manual clutched honda trail-70 motorcycle by watching what he did and trying it out when he wasn't around. he figured out what i was up to pretty quickly though.

good story syd.

mg said...

oh, and in june of 1983, i was enjoying what would be my last summer living on branched oak lake. we were the league champions for little chiefs baseball (i played third base and pitcher, believe it or not). and just the month before, in may of 1983, i had my first extended make out session. (i actually learned how to french kiss in kindergarten -- i was an early starter). but i digress...

sda said...

i was playing baseball for the ceresco travel team and working way to hard for no money on my grandparents farm -
walking beans, sitting on the "bean buggy" spraying god knows what on noxious weeds, and assembling Harvest King grain bins for the neighbors.

Sorel Top said...

Dad must've been playing with the scanner. I got one of me sleeping at the cattle auction. "Gravy" was class of '90 at LHS? I was '90. Of course, it was a big class.

Anonymous said...

1983 I was in 5th grade. Me and my friends were pretending to be The A-Team. Good times. Good times.

Anonymous said...

what's going on with the two folks on the far left??

june 1983, i had just mastered walking.

sydney_b said...

Funny. I didn't notice them. But, they are hanging on to the edge of the chute probably trying to get another calf loaded for the next competitor. They might also be hanging on up there because just a few seconds previously me and my horse would have been in the box and the horse may have been antsy.

dale said...

'83 I was systems administrator setting up computer labs for hardware and software developers. An 8x14" circuit pack would be crammed with memory chips to add up to 1MB! The disk controller and error correction circuitry took two circuit packs of discrete chips. Some things have changed a lot. And I feel old around here.

With the history between horses and bicycles, I don't think many equestrians become cyclists. Cool that you enjoy both, Syd.

sydney_b said...

You might be surprised, Dale. If you read over on Team Estrogen, a women's cycling site, There are several women who have horse/ranch backgrounds. Most of them are mnt bikers tho. I think it has to do with the personality thing. And that's where I'll stop on that. ;)

Dad said...

In June '83 I was putting my kid's life in jeopardy...*L* You maybe don't recall that this horse was Rodeo Red, aged 5, in this picture and that he had bucked off nearly everyone who had owned him...that's why I bought him, he was cheap...and later he was to be named heading horse of the year 3 times in the NSRA, and in the course of his career he bucked off nearly everyone who rode him at sometime, myself included.

But the interesting point is that at the point of competition you did not even consider that you were mounted on "buck you off Red" but only focused on the fact if you did your part...got out pushing the string and roped your calf...your mount would put you in a position to win. That's what mental focus is all about.

All competition is idealised backwards by consistent winners. For example, who wins a bicycle race or a roping? Best rider/roper - sometimes; best mounted - sometimes; but what wins everytime is the fast time! So when prepping to be a consistent competitor one must focus backwards...fast time, how is that accomplished consistently? By controlling all the factors over which the competitor has control. I have my choice of attitude, my choice of personal condition, my choice of mount, my willingness or unwillingness to master the techniques and skills that the winners exhibit each and every time. My focus and mental replays should be thus! Take control of what you control and don't beat yourself. If the mind is trained the body will follow. When one does that, you don't beat yourself very often...for after all, we are the enemy, always.

Another factor which you identify is that your mental images were always those of your dad and his friends. All of whom had the mindset and professional discipline that whether in the practice pen or in the height of competition focus was on perfection and petal-to-the-metal, but don't wreck performance was the enviroment in which you lived and grew up in...so in spite of yourself you only had one mental image and one attitude...go for it.

I don't ever remember having the boys ask for the Brown girls to fill one of their classes again either.

I don't know if your remember the year I campaigned Step Back Jack for his championship, but at Hasting we needed one more entry to make a 5 point class in the heeling. Nichole was with me and so I entered her to be riding Bobbi Joe, for a youth couldn't ride a stud, but mounted her on Kricket (both black). I told her that when it was her turn to rope that I would just head the steer and roll him easy out of the hole and that she should just throw her rope at his heels and that would be good - I didn't want her trying to dally and cut off a finger, not easy to explain to her mother - well all worked to the roll out easy, but she ropes both feet, dallies as Kricket parks, ready for the come tight jerk. She wins the class, I win third and become the laughing stock of all. She didn't practice either...like you she did with her hands what she'd watched her elders do...her perfect subconcious carried the day. My question to you is how tough could you gals have been if you practiced? *LOL* And yes, you'd have to beg before I would have entered you again.

I'm glad that you've kept this youthful training a part of your current ambition...it will serve you well!

sydney_b said...

Thx dad for filling in the details and for the legacy of focus and gunner attitude. I'd forgotten about Nichole and Kricket. That's funny. She said you sent that pic of her sleeping at the sale barn. That's the cutest picture ever I think. :)